Poker Video: Misc/Other by WiltOnTilt (Micro/Small Stakes)

Getting Serious About Poker: Overcoming Road Blocks

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Getting Serious About Poker: Overcoming Road Blocks by WiltOnTilt

Preparation is key in poker, but sometimes things don't go smoothly. How can you avoid repeating old mistakes? WiltOnTilt talks staying focused and avoiding resulted oriented thinking.

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WiltOnTilt's Haj School 2.0! Are you looking to improve your poker game but not seeing results? Getting Serious About Poker is designed to help answer all the other questions one has when looking to improve their game. How much should I study? What should I be focusing on? Should I get a coach? How can I overcome roadblocks? These are all questions that cross a poker player's path, and Wilt is here with the answers!

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variance results oriented getting serious about poker road blocks

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dddogkillah

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2883 posts
Joined 06/2014

HowieD

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62 posts
Joined 06/2013

Thumbs up for this series. Very good reinforcement of mental aspects/mental approach to working on/playing the game. I find your "rant" to be very insightful and crisp. Really enjoyed it, and inspired to do some more work. Thanks!

Posted over 2 years ago

Andyaaakk

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3 posts
Joined 08/2012

Great series , I have road blocks all over my game, the time has come for me to put the work in & not pretend too. Thanks for the inspiration...

Posted over 2 years ago

danf55

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107 posts
Joined 08/2012

Time Link to 00:11:11

Just listening to this and I thought to myself 'I'd raise J9o on 962'. Sure I wouldn't defend it from the SB but I would from the BB vs an active BU.

I guess as with a lot of situations it is very much game/ villain/ stack/ flow dependant etc, but it made me question my thoughts about it.

On that board vs a wide(ish) BU range, say 33% the villain still has 23% equity even when I remove any hands he is likely to obviously continue/ 3B with. Wouldn't it be better to c/r and deny them the opportunity to realise this equity as so much of their range couldn't continue? For example if we call and a 'scare' card hits and they bet again, what do we do? I sometimes get in these situations and it feels as though I'm 'wasting' my equity by simply calling especially when the over card and second barrel come. *Too results oriented?*

Posted over 2 years ago

WiltOnTilt

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2988 posts
Joined 10/2007

Just listening to this and I thought to myself 'I'd raise J9o on 962'. Sure I wouldn't defend it from the SB but I would from the BB vs an active BU.

I guess as with a lot of situations it is very much game/ villain/ stack/ flow dependant etc, but it made me question my thoughts about it.

On that board vs a wide(ish) BU range, say 33% the villain still has 23% equity even when I remove any hands he is likely to obviously continue/ 3B with. Wouldn't it be better to c/r and deny them the opportunity to realise this equity as so much of their range couldn't continue? For example if we call and a 'scare' card hits and they bet again, what do we do? I sometimes get in these situations and it feels as though I'm 'wasting' my equity by simply calling especially when the over card and second barrel come. *Too results oriented?*



If you are checkraising J9 on 962 in this spot, what does your c/c range look like?

Also I'd consider 33% button steal to be very tight, fyi

If overcards come, we probably keep calling and reevaluate what the river brings in terms of how it impacts the hands he bets on the turn and what we think the bottom of his value range is

Posted over 2 years ago

reesescup

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56 posts
Joined 03/2015

Just listening to this and I thought to myself 'I'd raise J9o on 962'. Sure I wouldn't defend it from the SB but I would from the BB vs an active BU.

I guess as with a lot of situations it is very much game/ villain/ stack/ flow dependant etc, but it made me question my thoughts about it.

On that board vs a wide(ish) BU range, say 33% the villain still has 23% equity even when I remove any hands he is likely to obviously continue/ 3B with. Wouldn't it be better to c/r and deny them the opportunity to realise this equity as so much of their range couldn't continue? For example if we call and a 'scare' card hits and they bet again, what do we do? I sometimes get in these situations and it feels as though I'm 'wasting' my equity by simply calling especially when the over card and second barrel come. *Too results oriented?*



Basically what he's saying is that if you can't have top pair in your check call range, when you call the flop you're going to look extremely weak. Think you're getting barreled a lot now? Against a thinking opponent who knows this, you'll be getting barreled even harder once he figures out you're check raising dry flops with all of your top pair hands.

Posted over 2 years ago

NinaWilliams

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969 posts
Joined 12/2007

If you are checkraising J9 on 962 in this spot, what does your c/c range look like?

Also I'd consider 33% button steal to be very tight, fyi

If overcards come, we probably keep calling and reevaluate what the river brings in terms of how it impacts the hands he bets on the turn and what we think the bottom of his value range is



this is something I've been thinking about and I think there's at least some merit to check raising these flops for thinnish value

Posted over 2 years ago

RegHC23

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5 posts
Joined 07/2013

I really love the video especially when you talked about running bad and that is what just happens. I appreciate the fact that if you keep working hard it is going to pay off. I have been on the downswing for about a month and have just been like pendulum and i truly feel good about my game so far, but i can never get what i want. I was down 4 buy ins yesterday at 10NL, but i found a way to comeback and win a buy in. I guess these comebacks are making me feel confident about my game, but i feel like when i am ready to just massacre the table it seems like things just falter and they falter bad.

Posted over 2 years ago

Lagornot

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28 posts
Joined 04/2011

Love your material Wilt! I mostly play live, and have a road block in the form of profitable hours i can play in a single session. I fined that if i play more than 4-6 hours i generally don't make any more money than if i had played my standard session. In fact i fined a loot of the time i end up loosing the money i won and end up booking a small win or a loss. Is this standard, or if not what can i do to turn more volume into more money?

Posted over 2 years ago

HowieD

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62 posts
Joined 06/2013

I have a similar experience, though playing tournaments. For me it has to do with getting tired and a bit restless, entering too many pots and a tendency to try to force things more, instead of playing my normal game. Also seems I'm "autopiloting" a bit more ( feels a bit like going speed-blind on a long drive) and making sloppy/suboptimal postflop descicions after several hours of play. I've had some success limiting these influences by including 30ish minute breaks every three-four hours; breaks doing something completely unrelated to poker. I try to time the breaks to before i enter tired-mode, because I notice its harder to get back to fresh if I dont. It's also been interesting to me that I'm much more aware now of my own state and how it affects my mindset while playing, whereas before I didnt actually notice a transition from being "fresh" and playing well to getting tired and playing sloppy. Anyways, I've seen a difference on my bottomn line after doing this, and I'm confident in attributing it to taking breaks and staying fresh. As an afterthought: Poker requires focus and discipline, right? Well what's happening to me when I get tired is I deviate from disciplined play towards personal tendencies (being impatient and a bit thrillseeking.) I think similar will happen to anyone, so you might get some insight into what's happening in your games by considering what your natural tendencies are. They are bound to be more prominent as you fatigue and lose discipline. Hope I didnt hi-jack the thread, as I'm sure a reply from Wilt himself would be preferable.

Posted over 2 years ago

WiltOnTilt

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2988 posts
Joined 10/2007

Love your material Wilt! I mostly play live, and have a road block in the form of profitable hours i can play in a single session. I fined that if i play more than 4-6 hours i generally don't make any more money than if i had played my standard session. In fact i fined a loot of the time i end up loosing the money i won and end up booking a small win or a loss. Is this standard, or if not what can i do to turn more volume into more money?



It sounds like a focus problem. Maybe take more breaks in your sessions? I've heard some podcasts that talk about having triggers that can help you refocus. Maybe a certain song or music or activity you can do in order to get back into the right frame of mind. I think just being aware of when you start to lose focus should help...take a walk, get a snack, and come back ready to battle.

Posted over 2 years ago

WiltOnTilt

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2988 posts
Joined 10/2007

Lagornot

Avatar for Lagornot

28 posts
Joined 04/2011

I have a similar experience, though playing tournaments. For me it has to do with getting tired and a bit restless, entering too many pots and a tendency to try to force things more, instead of playing my normal game. Also seems I'm "autopiloting" a bit more ( feels a bit like going speed-blind on a long drive) and making sloppy/suboptimal postflop descicions after several hours of play. I've had some success limiting these influences by including 30ish minute breaks every three-four hours; breaks doing something completely unrelated to poker. I try to time the breaks to before i enter tired-mode, because I notice its harder to get back to fresh if I dont. It's also been interesting to me that I'm much more aware now of my own state and how it affects my mindset while playing, whereas before I didnt actually notice a transition from being "fresh" and playing well to getting tired and playing sloppy. Anyways, I've seen a difference on my bottomn line after doing this, and I'm confident in attributing it to taking breaks and staying fresh. As an afterthought: Poker requires focus and discipline, right? Well what's happening to me when I get tired is I deviate from disciplined play towards personal tendencies (being impatient and a bit thrillseeking.) I think similar will happen to anyone, so you might get some insight into what's happening in your games by considering what your natural tendencies are. They are bound to be more prominent as you fatigue and lose discipline. Hope I didnt hi-jack the thread, as I'm sure a reply from Wilt himself would be preferable.




Good advice, I remember Tommy Angelo saying it's important to take a break after every 4 hours of play. I just haven't taken that advice all that serious, but i think its time to! I think my problem is falling into fatigue and getting that fog at the table which leads to poor play.

Posted over 2 years ago

Lagornot

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28 posts
Joined 04/2011

It sounds like a focus problem. Maybe take more breaks in your sessions? I've heard some podcasts that talk about having triggers that can help you refocus. Maybe a certain song or music or activity you can do in order to get back into the right frame of mind. I think just being aware of when you start to lose focus should help...take a walk, get a snack, and come back ready to battle.




What do you do to stay sharp when playing live, and how long do you play?

Posted over 2 years ago

WiltOnTilt

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2988 posts
Joined 10/2007

What do you do to stay sharp when playing live, and how long do you play?



These days I usually play until the game gets bad, just because games at high stakes don't run super often where I live, so if the game is running, I force myself to push through.

Part of the consideration is that I've raised the level of my B and C game to still be competitive. So much of what I know has been ingrained in me that even when I'm playing poorly, it's probably still good enough to win. So that has come with years of study and practice.

I've mentioned this before in a few different videos but IMO increasing your edge is a pretty good way to fix your mental game. Of course reading Tommy Angelo and Jared Tendler and using their techniques can also help.

If I was starting over and couldn't rely on my skill to get me through focus issues, I would take more breaks, be careful about eating big meals before/during sessions, force myself to take more notes on my phone to gather reads on my opponents, force myself to actively put each player on a range even after I fold, stop myself from using facebook or twitter or watching tv during the games, etc. At least if you do those things, you can maximize your focus while you are there, even if that means you get more mentally tired faster.

Posted over 2 years ago

Lagornot

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28 posts
Joined 04/2011

dddogkillah

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2883 posts
Joined 06/2014

, and come back ready to battle.


Boom! Love the advice Smile

Posted over 2 years ago

HowieD

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62 posts
Joined 06/2013

blackluster777

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420 posts
Joined 12/2013

Great video. Definitely helped to hear the sections on Respecting Variance and Being Wrong.

"I've mentioned this before in a few different videos but IMO increasing your edge is a pretty good way to fix your mental game. Of course reading Tommy Angelo and Jared Tendler and using their techniques can also help."

I remember when I first heard this I disagreed, but as time has passed, I think this is incredibly true. Gaining a deeper understanding of why you are making certain decisions fixes tons of mental game issues because it removes some of the uncertainty which leads to mental game issues(angst, spew, etc). The techniques they promote are absolutely beneficial, but there needs to be a balance for each individual discovered by each individual.

Thanks for the content Wilt

Posted over 2 years ago

WiltOnTilt

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2988 posts
Joined 10/2007

Great video. Definitely helped to hear the sections on Respecting Variance and Being Wrong.

"I've mentioned this before in a few different videos but IMO increasing your edge is a pretty good way to fix your mental game. Of course reading Tommy Angelo and Jared Tendler and using their techniques can also help."

I remember when I first heard this I disagreed, but as time has passed, I think this is incredibly true. Gaining a deeper understanding of why you are making certain decisions fixes tons of mental game issues because it removes some of the uncertainty which leads to mental game issues(angst, spew, etc). The techniques they promote are absolutely beneficial, but there needs to be a balance for each individual discovered by each individual.

Thanks for the content Wilt



Thanks for the nice comment! Glad you found it helpful.

Posted over 2 years ago

lucyluu

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15 posts
Joined 09/2013

WiltOnTilt

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2988 posts
Joined 10/2007

scraps_money

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1 posts
Joined 10/2013

thanks this really helps me to refresh my mindset

Posted about 2 years ago



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