Poker Video: Limit Hold'Em by DeathDonkey (Micro/Small Stakes)

Mano a Mule: Episode One

This video is a two minute preview. To view the entire video, please Log In or Sign Up Now
Get the Flash Player to see this player.
 

Mano a Mule: Episode One by DeathDonkey

DeathDonkey introduces his heads up limit hold'em series, discusses some general heads up topics, and spends some time talking about preflop play using PokerStove hand ranges.

About Mano a Mule Subscribe to

DeathDonkey covers the fundamentals of HU LHE play, dealing with a variety of opponent types and unique situations. From loose passives to maniacs to tough heads up specialists, DD will make you a force to be reckoned with.

Tags

deathdonkey heads up limit hold'em ipod friendly hu

Video Details

  • Game: lhe
  • Stakes: Micro/Small Stakes
  • 45 minutes long
  • Posted about 6 years ago

Downloads

Premium Subscribers can download high-quality, DRM-free videos in multiple formats.

Sign Up Today


Comments for Mano a Mule: Episode One

or track by Email or RSS


jajvirta

Avatar for jajvirta

725 posts
Joined 03/2007

jajvirta

Avatar for jajvirta

725 posts
Joined 03/2007

One thing that I have always been curious about is your own tilting. "Your" referring to executive producers in general. You do sound real calm and professional during the videos, which is how it should be of course, but I'm guessing that y'all haven't always been like completely tilt-free Zen-monks, right?

HUHU gives the word "tilt" a whole new meaning. I do think that tilting is in essence a status issue and HUHU game magnifies this aspect to whole new proportions. I'm sure that even Dalai Lama would be banging his head to the keyboard after not winning a single pot for ages and the opponent insulting you on the chat constantly for being a fish.

So, dear executive producers, open up and share your dirty little tilt secrets. Ever smashed a keyboard to the floor? Torn your hair and cursed like a Russian salesman? Gone off on the chat and gave back insults to the opponent?

Posted about 6 years ago

fslexcduck

Avatar for fslexcduck

419 posts
Joined 10/2007

i used to tilt a loooooooot. i think it comes down to playing a ton of hands and having experience. i can sometimes fall into the trap of tilting still, if i'm playing sporadically and not running well. these days, tilt usually takes the form of playing a much more aggressive style HU (NL mostly) and trying to force big pots. this isn't my style normally, so i sacrifice EV by not playing my best poker when i'm doing this. i might still be playing a winning strategy, but it's higher variance and not AS winning as it should be, which leads me to much swingier sessions than i care to have.

it sounds easy to say but for me, looking at a session as part of the bigger picture is important. also, when the losses are large and i'm "chasing" them and playing too aggressively and the session becomes a session in isolation, having the discipline to stop is really important.

sorry, no stories about breaking shit though. maybe it's cuz i'm a girl, i dunno, but i'm running pretty well in computer hardware EV.

Posted about 6 years ago

DeathDonkey

Avatar for DeathDonkey

5389 posts
Joined 11/2006

I guess I am the exception to the rule, I honestly play poker like I do in the videos and have NEVER in 4 years of online poker yelled out loud at the screen, I would find myself ridiculous. I didn't realize anyone ever did that until I heard some other poker videos (that weren't like for a training site, just someone made them and posted a link on 2+2) and they would whine and taunt their opponents verbally which I thought was hilarious.

Anyway when I am super frustrated playing HU I certainly am not flawless in my not tilting with my play, but I am happy to say I don't tilt in any HUGE ways, like blind capping for a few hands in a row or something silly. After a particularly sick hand the worst I've done is probably quietly said "wow" to myself.

Anyway as I get into some live play in this series we'll see if I manage to keep my tilt in check Smile

-DeathDonkey

Posted about 6 years ago

DJ Sensei

Avatar for DJ Sensei

3280 posts
Joined 10/2007

I too don´t really ever have hard tilt problems to speak of. I think much of it has to do with the fact that
1) I´m a pretty laid-back guy to begin with. It takes a lot to get me riled up, and in fact my worst "tilt" comes in things that don´t involve money whatsoever, like when I´m playing a board game with friends and make a bad move.
2) The money doesn´t mean all that much to me. I never play over my head, or with money that "matters". Also, I´m young and my lifestyle is pretty cheap, so the amounts of money I´m playing with are pretty abstract to me. If I attached the amounts of money to usable objects or expenses, maybe I´d be angrier about bad beats, but I don´t. Its just a video game to me, really, except every now and again I tell the video game to send me a check.
3) I´ve played a ton of hands, and taken (and given!) just about every beat you can imagine, so its not like there are new plateaus of beats for me to reach, except perhaps in amount of money or something.
4) I win a lot, both short term and long term (but especially long term). When a bad beat means you´re up 19x instead of 20x for the week/month/year, its hard to be too mad about it. Focus on the long term and try not to worry about short-term results and you won´t stress the beats as much.

Posted about 6 years ago

DeathDonkey

Avatar for DeathDonkey

5389 posts
Joined 11/2006

DJ I really connected with your point #2. I went right from playing online computer games to poker and treat them similarly.

Btw, regarding my video, I make one pretty obvious error when discussing how much a guy has to fold his BB to insta-profit. He is getting 3:1 to call but probably more importantly I over simplified the problem because things like implied odds and reverse implied odds effect his decision as well as the pure pot odds he's receiving. Anyway that point was sort of muddy and not really profound, so just pretend like I ignored the subject completely Smile

-DeathDonkey

Posted about 6 years ago

Hypnotic

Avatar for Hypnotic

1169 posts
Joined 02/2008

Good video, DD

I have just started playing heads up over the last couple weeks, and I am doing well (I just play SnGs, not cash yet.)

I think this was a good starter video. I am sure you will cover this in later videos, but I was curious about how often, and with what ranges is best to:

1) 3-bet aggro players pre-flop
2) Raise passive players that limp pre-flop

(obv post flop play of the villains makes a big difference here as well)

I have noticed that when I start to raise passive limpers who are weak tight postflop to make more off of their folding mistakes, they some times start to raise PF instead of limping... I don't like that lol.


I actually got into heads up from watching the videos on HU limit made by both you and Joe Tall. All of the HU limit stand alone vids are amazing imo. Although after watching those, the first in this series seems kind of basic, I appreciated the stove work done to give some concrete
numbers to the ranges.

(I owe you and Joe a big thank you since I am (running very well) winning 70% of my SnGs and am just a few wins from breaking into the sharkscope
leaderboard.)

Posted about 6 years ago

jajvirta

Avatar for jajvirta

725 posts
Joined 03/2007

You mentioned these VP$IP/PFR 90/20 players, who seem to be pretty commonplace. Is your blind defence strategy here basically the same as it would be on BB against similar range on the button (and adjusting for the absence of the SB)? I find no particular reason to deviate from this strategy, assuming that there are no other factors like for example the villain tilting or something.

Posted about 6 years ago

DeathDonkey

Avatar for DeathDonkey

5389 posts
Joined 11/2006

Hypnotic: thanks for the kind words. While its true they may start to raise a bit more (probably in their mind to "beat you to the punch") its not necessarily a bad thing if they play bad postflop - you can just checkraise a lot of flops that should miss their range and follow through. Their fit or fold ways will still be their downfall. I will certainly be covering all your questions and more - I am intending to structure the series by playing against and talking about playing various types of opponents, rather than structure it street by street or something. To me that made the most sense.

jaj: I agree with you, there is no real reason to deviate. I defend with a pretty wide range against even fairly passive stealers though (HU, 6 max, whatever). But against the decent HU players who are raising the majority of their buttons its important to expand your defending range even wider, something I feel most TAGs trying to get into HU are very uncomfortable doing.

I was talking to a friend who watched this series premier and was surprised at how loose I talk about playing both stealing and defending and I said to him effectively "when you first learn decent strategy you learn how to win by being tighter than your opponents preflop. Most TAGs at micro stakes never advance beyond decent preflop play and are pretty mediocre postflop, so when they go to play heads up they find all that preflop folding skill they learned is useless and their postflop skill is not up to par." Hopefully I can teach a thing or two about the all important postflop play against the many different HU opponent types in this series.

-DeathDonkey

Posted about 6 years ago

KRANTZ

Avatar for KRANTZ

3147 posts
Joined 07/2007

jajvirta

Avatar for jajvirta

725 posts
Joined 03/2007

I said to him effectively "when you first learn decent strategy you learn how to win by being tighter than your opponents preflop. Most TAGs at micro stakes never advance beyond decent preflop play and are pretty mediocre postflop, so when they go to play heads up they find all that preflop folding skill they learned is useless and their postflop skill is not up to par." Hopefully I can teach a thing or two about the all important postflop play against the many different HU opponent types in this series.



Yeah, and it's funny, people talk about how postflop becomes more important in short-handed limit hold'em, but many TAGs are just playing tight preflop and get their profit from loose/passives who don't adjust to the TAGs' strong range so this style is pretty decent with good table selection. But I guess the same troubles prop up in midstakes if a TAG has serious weaknesses in his postflop play. The worst loose/passives and few and far between and even bad lagtards are probably going to run over weak/tights, nevermind the good LAGTAGs.

It's pretty much the nightmare setup for a TAG trying out HUHU to play against a maniac. It's a good mental training to cope with situations where one constantly ends up paying off a true HUHU maniac with A/K high when he almost always has a good hand and berates you on the chat.

By the way, I'm not necessarily not talking about myself here. ;-)

Posted about 6 years ago

Hypnotic

Avatar for Hypnotic

1169 posts
Joined 02/2008

Hopefully I can teach a thing or two about the all important postflop play against the many different HU opponent types in this series.



I like the think that playing HU from watching DC vids has improved my 6 max postflop game, too. I think it has mostly in BvB situations.

I feel pretty comfortable in BvB now, and also am much more OK with using game creation when I play 6 max.

On the other hand, I think that I have gotten into some trouble calling down too light not believing the villain because I am used to thinking that there is no way they have anything from playing so much HU Poke Tongue

Anyway, the 6 max and HU limit holdem vids on DC from the entire limit crew (DD, Danza, Joe, Entity, Oink) have been great.

My 6 month membership paid for itself before my 7 day trial was over.

Posted about 6 years ago

Entity

Avatar for Entity

8633 posts
Joined 11/2006


My 6 month membership paid for itself before my 7 day trial was over.



HOLLA! Smile

That's what we like to hear.

Rob

Posted about 6 years ago

jajvirta

Avatar for jajvirta

725 posts
Joined 03/2007

By the way, how big of a mistake it is for a villain to raise on the button only like 25% of the hands? I know it's near impossible to quantify with any formal way (unless you're Bryce I guess?) but I take it that you have an idea of the magnitude, at least. I understand the principle, but I'm having hard time getting a feel of how big a mistake it is. It's certainly nice to play small pots OOP and bigger on position and it's also nice to have free flops with 52o and to have the villain's raising range defined that accurately, but it's hard to say how nice. With my experience and understanding at least.

Posted about 6 years ago




HomePoker ForumsBeginner Limit Hold'em → Mano a Mule : Episode One